Laguz

The Waters of Wyrd, the depths of the unconscious, the flow of magic, the dreamworld where creatures of magic and myth roam free.  Don’t underestimate the power of Laguz, the rune of water.  The mysteries of water have long held sway over man’s imagination.  Human life is formed in water and, to our northern ancestors, the deep waters were doorways to the world of the dead.  As the rune of water Laguz might be said to contain the power of Wyrd itself; the flowing waters of creation, consciousness, memory and magic.  For some commentators, the Laguz rune also represents Frigga’s magic spindle upon which the threads of Wyrd are spun.  In this sense Laguz represents not just the flow of Wyrd, but also the power to shape and form our own destinies.

Work with and meditate on water in its many forms to connect to the energy of Laguz.  The dark depths, rushing waterfall, cleansing rain, powerful sea, gentle dew, merciless torrents, cathartic tears and sparkling stream – all hold the power of Laguz.  Form the shape of Laguz with your body and let its power flow through you, listen to its song and let it carry you into its mysteries .

One of the objects of power associated with Laguz is the distaff or spindle (the axe, cited below relates to the legend of Forsetti’s axe).   The shape of the rune itself is said to represent the spinning shaft of the spindle with the little hook at the top being the emerging thread.  The distaff is sacred to Frigga who is said to spin the coulds themselves and, in some legends, spins the stuff of Wyrd whic his then used to weave fate by the Nornir.  

In the northern tradition water represents both opportunity and danger.  It is the gateway to the unknown.  The Vikings were masters of sea-craft and both loved, respected and feared the waters which brought both riches and death.  As with many traditions the deities associated with water speak to its changeable nature.  When appropriately honoured Njord and Nerthus are benevolent and wise, they control the union of land and water through which life springs.  Aegir and his daughters are far less predictable and represent the wild, implacable and destructive force of the sea.  Ran, Aegir’s wife embodies the mercy of death and rest, like Hela, Odin and Freyja she is one of the deities who presides over the dead.  On land springs, wells and rivers also act as gateways between the realms.  There are many legends of water spirits and local deities offerings gifts of both life and death through conferring fertility on the land, bringing wisdom and carrying the souls of the departed to peace.  The necessity, and benefits, of tending to relationships with local water spirits is one of the many aspects of our northern heritage that sorely needs to be recovered. 

Deepening your connection to Laguz

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